Baseball

 Baseball injuries are common.  The most common injury other than simple strains and sprains is an injury to the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow which is generally caused by throwing too much.  Shoulder injuries in young baseball players such as Little League Shoulder also are commonly related to throwing too hard, too much and without appropriate rest.  Little League Baseball has recommended maximum pitch counts to decrease the frequency of shoulder and elbow injuries.  Maximum pitch counts as recommeded by Little League Baseball are:

League Age Pitches per day
7-8 50 pitches per day
9-10 75 pitches per day
11-12 85 pitches per day
13-16 95 pitches per day
17-18 105 pitches per day

Little League Baseball has also recommended rest periods for pitchers.  Rest requirements as recommeded by Little League Baseball are:

Pitchers league age 16 and under must adhere to the following rest requirements:
• If a player pitches 61 or more pitches in a day, three (3) calendar days of rest and a game (see e. below) must
be observed.
• If a player pitches 41 - 60 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest and a game (see e. below) must be
observed.
• If a player pitches 21 - 40 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar days of rest must be observed.
• If a player pitches 1-20 pitches in a day, no (0) calendar day of rest must be observed.
Pitchers league age 17-18 must adhere to the following rest requirements:
• If a player pitches 76 or more pitches in a day, three (3) calendar days of rest and a game (see e. below) must
be observed.
• If a player pitches 51 - 75 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest and a game (see e. below) must be
observed.
• If a player pitches 26 - 50 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar days of rest must be observed.
• If a player pitches 1-25 pitches in a day, no (0) calendar day of rest must be observed.

Further information on Little League Baseballs Pitch count and rest period regulations can be found here.

Baseball has one of the highest rates of catastrophic injury and fatality in sports, especially for children under 14. The fatal direct injury rate has been reported at 0.1 per 100 000 participants. These are generally related to ball or bat impacts. Ball-player impacts account for approximately 60% of baseball-related injuries and occur commonly in defensive (fielding) players.
Metal bats have higher ball exit velocity and may be responsible for increased risk of injury, especially to pitchers.

Throwing athletes with recurrent soreness or pain in the shoulder or elbow after throwing should see a physician who specializes in Sports Medicine.  Baseball sports tips from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine can be found here.

 

OCD of the Capitellum:

Posterior GH instability
Mallet Finger
Scapular Dyskinesis
Dental Injuries: Tooth avulsion
Eye injuries: malar fractures, ocular tearing, corneal abrasion, subconjunctival haemorrhage.
Olecranon Stress Fracture
Hook of the Hamate fracture
Posterior Elbow Impingement
Ulnar neuropathy

  (Kim DH, AJSM 2006;34:438).

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